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Posts Tagged ‘Umberto Eco’

Word of the Day: scapular

scap·u·lar 2 /ˈskæpyələr/

–noun
1. Ecclesiastical . a loose, sleeveless monastic garment, hanging from the shoulders.
2. two small pieces of woolen cloth, joined by strings passing over the shoulders, worn under the ordinary clothing as a badge of affiliation with a religious order, a token of devotion, etc.
3. Anatomy, Zoology . scapula.
4. Ornithology . one of the scapular feathers.

Origin:
1475–85; < ML
scapulāre, n. use of neut. of scapulāris (adj.). See scapular 1

Source: Dictionary.com.

The monks were now standing at the tables, motionless, their cowls lowered over their faces, their hands under their scapulars.

Source: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

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antistrophe

28 September 2010 Leave a comment

an·tis·tro·phe /ænˈtɪstrəfi/

–noun
1. the part of an ancient Greek choral ode answering a previous strophe, sung by the chorus when returning from left to right.
2. the movement performed by the chorus while singing an antistrophe.
3. Prosody . the second of two metrically corresponding systems in a poem. Compare strophe ( def. 3 ) .

Origin:
1540–50; < Gk: a turning about. See anti-, strophe

—Related forms
an·ti·stroph·ic  /ˌæntəˈstrɒfɪk, -ˈstroʊfɪk/, an·tis·tro·phal, adjective
an·ti·stroph·i·cal·ly, adverb

Source: Dictionary.com.

It was already part of the story he heard and repeated, or that Berengar imagined, in his agitation and his remorse. Because there is, as antistrophe to Adelmo’s remorse, a remorse of Berengar’s: you heard it.

Source: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

lemures

28 September 2010 Leave a comment

lem·u·res /ˈlɛmyəˌriz; Lat. ˈlɛmʊˌrɛs/

–plural noun Roman Religion .
the ghosts of the dead of a family, considered as troublesome unless exorcised or propitiated; larvae.

Origin:
1545–55; < L; see lemur

Source: Dictionary.com.

I realized I was having a vision and that there was a damned soul before me, one of the lemures.

Source: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

balneary

28 September 2010 Leave a comment

Balneary \Bal”ne*a*ry\, n. [L. balnearium, fr. balneum bath.]
A bathing room. –Sir T. Browne.

Source: Die.net.

balneal or balneary (ˈbælnɪəl, ˈbælnɪərɪ)

— adj
rare of or relating to baths or bathing

[C17: from Latin balneum bath, from Greek balaneion ]

Source: Dictionary.com.

without difficulty we opened the door of the balneary, next to the infirmary.

Separated one from the other by thick curtains were some tubs, I don’t recall how many. The monks used them for their ablutions, on the days the Rule established, and Severinus used them for therapeutic reasons, because nothing can restore body and mind better than a bath. A fireplace in one corner allowed the water to be heated easily. We found it dirty with fresh ashes, and before it a great cauldron lay, overturned. The water could be drawn from a font in another corner.

Source: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

versicle

28 September 2010 Leave a comment

ver·si·cle /ˈvɜrsɪkəl/

–noun
1. a little verse.
2. Ecclesiastical . a short verse, usually from the Psalms, said or sung by the officiant, after which the congregation recites a response. Compare response ( def. 3a ) .

Origin:
1350–1400; ME < L versiculus. See verse, -i-, -cle 1

Source: Dictionary.com.

But after the responsory, the hymn, and the versicle, as the chanting of the Gospel began, I glimpsed just above the altar, beyond the windows of the choir, a pale glow that was already making the panes shine in their various colors, subdued till then by the darkness.

Source: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

responsory

28 September 2010 Leave a comment

re·spon·so·ry /rɪˈspɒnsəri/

–noun, plural -ries. Ecclesiastical .
an anthem sung after a lection by a soloist and choir alternately.

Origin:
1375–1425; late ME < LL respōnsōrium, equiv. to L respond ( ēre ) to respond + –tōrium -tory2 , with dt > s

Source: Dictionary.com.

But after the responsory, the hymn, and the versicle, as the chanting of the Gospel began, I glimpsed just above the altar, beyond the windows of the choir, a pale glow that was already making the panes shine in their various colors, subdued till then by the darkness.

Source: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.

hebdomadary

28 September 2010 Leave a comment

heb·dom·a·dar·y /hɛbˈdɒməˌdɛri/ noun, plural -dar·ies, adjective

–noun
1. Roman Catholic Church . a member of a church or monastery appointed for one week to sing the chapter Mass and lead in the recitation of the breviary.

–adjective
2. hebdomadal ( def. 1 ) .

Origin:
1400–50; late ME ebdomadarie < LL hebdomadārius. See hebdomad, -ary

Source: Dictionary.com.

Then the abbot gave his benediction, the hebdomadary said the prayers, all bowed toward the altar

Source: The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco.